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Home Pride Inspections

When I inspect a home, it is with the endeavor to point out typical as well as any possible major defects in the home at the time of inspection.  From the foundation to the roof top, I work for you!

I will also include Health, Safety, Maintenance and Energy items that may be observed in the course of my evaluation.  Home Pride will equip you with helpful information that you will need to know to make your decision with confidence.

My service is to provide the purchaser with a guided tour of the home, inside and out, inspecting it as I go through.  I will show you where important items are such as the location of shut-off valves and switches, and explain the condition of those items.  I will also be testing and checking other items using state of the art equipment and provide you with the results in a professional, in-depth report.  All homes should be inspected regardless of age (new construction as well as older homes).

In the case of a seller requested inspection (pre-inspection), I can advise the seller of problems early on so you can avoid costly last minute repairs and avoid last minute delays.  Your potential purchaser can contact me for a second walk through with them at a reduced rate.

I put pride in my work so you can have Home Pride in your home.  All inspections are preformed by a Certified member of NACHI and meet or exceed the "Standards of Practice" and "Code of Ethics".  My reports are computer generated which may include photos and can be emailed to you.














Home Pride Inspection Services

A Home Inspection is a limited, non-invasive examination of the condition of a home, often in connection with the sale of that home. Home inspections are usually conducted by a home inspector who has the training and certifications to perform such inspections. The inspector prepares and delivers to the client a written report of findings. The client then uses the knowledge gained to make informed decisions about their pending real estate purchase. The home inspector describes the condition of the home at the time of inspection but does not guarantee future condition, efficiency, or life expectancy of systems or components.[1]

A home inspector is sometimes confused with a real estate appraiser. A home inspector determines the condition of a structure, whereas an appraiser determines the value of a property. Although not all states or municipalities in the U.S. regulate home inspectors, there are some professional associations for home inspectors that provide education, training, and networking opportunities. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an inspection to verify compliance with appropriate codes.

 

Fire Protection is the study and practice of mitigating the unwanted effects of potentially destructive fires.[1] It involves the study of the behaviour, compartmentalisation, suppression and investigation of fire and its related emergencies, as well as the research and development, production, testing and application of mitigating systems. In structures, be they land-based, offshore or even ships, the owners and operators are responsible to maintain their facilities in accordance with a design-basis that is rooted in laws, including the local building code and fire code, which are enforced by the Authority Having Jurisdiction. Buildings must be constructed in accordance with the version of the building code that is in effect when an application for a building permit is made. Building inspectors check on compliance of a building under construction with the building code. Once construction is complete, a building must be maintained in accordance with the current fire code, which is enforced by the fire prevention officers of a local fire department. In the event of fire emergencies, Firefighters, fire investigators, and other fire prevention personnel called to mitigate, investigate and learn from the damage of a fire. Lessons learned from fires are applied to the authoring of both building codes and fire codes.

 

Radon TestingASTM E-2121 is a US standard for reducing radon in homes as far as practicable below 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) (148 Bq/m3) in indoor air. [1][2] Radon test kits are commercially available.[3] The kit includes a collector that the user hangs in the lowest livable floor of the house for 2 to 7 days. The user then sends the collector to a laboratory for analysis. The National Environmental Health Association provides a list of radon measurement professionals in the United States.[4] Long-term kits, taking collections from 91 days to one year, are also available. An open land test kit can test radon emissions from the land before construction begins. The EPA and the National Environmental Health Association have identified 15 types of radon testing.[5] A Lucas cell is one type of device.

Radon levels fluctuate naturally. An initial test might not be an accurate assessment of a home's average radon level. Transient weather can affect short-term measurements.[6] Therefore, a high result (over 4 pCi/L) justifies repeating the test before undertaking more expensive abatement projects. Measurements between 4 and 10 pCi/L (148 and 370 Bq/m3) warrant a long-term radon test. Measurements over 10 pCi/L (370 Bq/m3) warrant only another short-term test so that abatement measures are not unduly delayed. Purchasers of real estate are advised to delay or decline a purchase if the seller has not successfully abated radon to 4 pCi/L or less.

The National Environmental Health Association administers a voluntary National Radon Proficiency Program for radon professionals consisting of individuals and companies wanting to take training courses and examinations to demonstrate their competency.[7] A list of mitigation service providers is available.[8]

There is no regulation in Canada that governs what is deemed to be an acceptable radon gas level in a house. It is the choice of each homeowner to determine what level of radon gas exposure they are willing to accept. Canadian Government, in conjunction with the territories and provinces, developed the guideline[9] to indicate when remedial action should be taken. This guideline was approved by the Federal Provincial Territorial Radiation Protection Committee in October, 2006

 

Mold Sampling - In general the EPA does not recommend sampling unless an occupant of the space is symptomatic. When sampling is necessary it should be performed by a trained professional who has specific experience in designing mold-sampling protocols, sampling methods, and the interpretation of findings. Sampling should only be conducted to answer a pertinent question: examples "what is the spore concentration in the air", or "is a particular species of fungi present in the building." The following additional question should be asked before sampling: "what action can or should a person take upon obtaining data."

The sampling and analysis should follow the recommendations of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA). Most importantly, when a sample is taken the proper chain of custody should be adhered to. The AIHA offers lists of accredited laboratories that submit to required quarterly proficiency testing.

Three types of sampling include but are not limited to::

  • Air sampling: the most common form of sampling to assess the level of mold. Sampling of the inside and outdoor air is conducted and the results to the level of mold spores inside the premises and outside are compared. Often, air sampling will provide positive identification of the existence of non-visible mold.
  • Surface samples: sampling the amount of mold spores deposited on indoor surfaces (tape, and dust samples)
  • Bulk samples: the removal of materials from the contaminated area to identify and determine the concentration of mold in the sample.

When sampling is conducted, all three types are recommended by the AIHA, as each sample method alone has specific limitations. For example, air samples will not provide proof of a hidden source of mold. Nor would a tape sample provide the level of contamination in the air.[7]

Though it may not be recommended, air sampling following mold remediation is usually the best way to ascertain efficacy of remediation, when conducted by a qualified third party.[8]